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Although there is currently a horrifying outbreak in Brazil, which has been a dominant subject within the media, Zika is present in roughly 48 countries, two of which are African: Cabo Verde and Gabon.

So far, it has been reported that the impact of Zika is greater at the moment in the South American region. Frequent reports have been issued upon the presence of Zika and its effects in Brazil, however the emergence of the virus can be traced back to over 60 years ago in Uganda. Would we have been more prepared to face the current Zika outbreak if there had been more research and more awareness raised on its impact upon Africa?

(United-Nations- GENEVA)-As stated by the spokesperson for WHO (World Health Organisation) during a UN press briefing, there appears to be more of a natural immunity to the Zika virus in the African region rather than in Brazil. The Zika virus has had a devastating impact upon victims in Brazil, and it has started to spread across both South and Central America. It has recently been considered to be linked to the neurodevelopmental disorder, microcephaly.

Tensions and concerns are extremely high in South America at present, in regards to the possible risk that Zika could also cause Microcephaly in babies and children. 

 

Fadila Chaib, spokesperson for WHO, has declared that in response to the dramatic rise of Zika cases in Brazil, Margaret Chan, the director general, has met with the Brazilian minister of health to evaluate the Zika situation and documents have been issued regarding mums and children with the Zika virus and how to cope with a child that could potentially be born with a small sized head.